Modern Science of Biomechanics and Type 1 Diabetes

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Postural Profile of People with Type 1 Diabetes - I page 1 of 3 I

If you look at people with Type 1 diabetes and people without Type 1 diabetes, it is hard to notice any differences in their shape of musculoskeletal system from the rest of the population, but if you know what you are looking for, than it is easy to notice significant differences.

Quote:

The hardest thing to see is what is in front of your eyes. - Johann Wolfgang von Goethe


Upon a closer look, it can be noticed that people with type 1 diabetes share certain postural characteristics.
One type of posture that is prevalent among people with Type 1 diabetes is the swayback posture
  
The pictures below are examples of the swayback posture of people with Type 1 diabetes.
https://sites.google.com/site/modernscienceofbiomechanics/type1diabetes/page3/1%20-%20T1D%20-%201.jpg?attredirects=0                   https://sites.google.com/site/modernscienceofbiomechanics/type1diabetes/page3/1%20-%20T1D%20-%202.jpg?attredirects=0                 https://sites.google.com/site/modernscienceofbiomechanics/type1diabetes/page3/1%20-%20T1D%20-%203.jpg?attredirects=0

Click on the link or on the picture to go to the original source of the picture – (the link opens in a new window).

 

There are two main types of swayback posture that appear similar to each other, but there are significant differences.

One type of swayback posture is when the lumbar spine is excessively curved inward (swayback-lordosis-posture). This type of posture is not prevalent among people with Type 1 diabetes.

The type of swayback posture where the lumbar spine maintains a natural inward curvature, or is slightly flattened is prevalent among people with Type 1 diabetes.

1.    A swayback posture is very common among people with type 1 diabetes.

 

2.    A swayback posture is relatively rare among people without Type 1 diabetes.

 

3.     A faulty lordotic posture, which is by many mistaken to be a swayback posture, is relatively common among people without type 1 diabetes.

 


The swayback posture that is prevalent among people with type 1 diabetes is the lower chest forward posture. it look similar to average swayback posture in people without T1D but by close look it is quite different. 

Side note: The problem is explaining the lower chest forward posture because it is a new term that I was forced to introduce, because none have mentioned it before. But taking a closer look at people with Type 1 diabetes, it can be noticed that their posture is similar to an average upright posture, but only their ribcage is swayed backward. Their top of their rib cages are excessively tilt backwards, causing the bottom of the rib cage to thrust forward. Looking at the front of the body, it gives the appearance of the lower chest being thrust forward. This type of posture can be called upper torso sway back posture or lower chest forward posture.



The pictures below are examples of a lower chest forward posture of children with Type 1 diabetes.

 

https://sites.google.com/site/modernscienceofbiomechanics/type1diabetes/page3/1%20-%20T1D%20-%204.jpg?attredirects=0                     https://sites.google.com/site/modernscienceofbiomechanics/type1diabetes/page3/1%20-%20T1D%20-%205.jpg?attredirects=0                    https://sites.google.com/site/modernscienceofbiomechanics/type1diabetes/page3/1%20-%20T1D.-%206.jpg?attredirects=0

Click on the link or on the picture to go to the original source of the picture – (the link opens in a new window).

 

Lower chest forward posture is prevalent only among people with Type 1 Diabetes.



It is more convincing to see a picture of a group of people (children) with Type 1 diabetes.
 
https://sites.google.com/site/modernscienceofbiomechanics/type1diabetes/page3/3%20-%20T1D%20-%207.jpg?attredirects=0

Click on the link or on the picture to go to the original source of the picture – (the link opens in a new window).

 

The picture above (Group of Children with Type 1 Diabetes) clearly shows that all children have either a swayback posture or a lower chest forward posture.


 

Next page: Postural Profile of People with Type 1 Diabetes - I page 2 of 3 I

 

Previous page: Introduction

 

 

 

 

 

 Modern Science of Biomechanics and Type 1 Diabetes

Site Map

 

Contents – Page 1

Introduction – Page 2A and Page 2B

Postural Profile of People with Type 1 Diabetes – Page 3, Page 4 and Page 5

Postural and Musculoskeletal Characteristics of Normal Weight People without and with T1D - Page 6

Spontaneous Remission of Type 1 Diabetes – Page 7

Obesity and Type 1 Diabetes – Obesity Protect against Type 1 Diabetes? – Page 8

Weight Loss and Type 1 Diabetes – Weight loss linked to Type 1 Diabetes? - Page 9

Insulin Therapy and Weight Gain – Page 10

Exercises Induced Low Blood Sugar (Hypoglycaemia) and High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycaemia) - Page 11

 

Appendix

 

Type 1 Diabetes in American Indians and Alaska Natives - Page 12a

Type 1 Diabetes among the Amish – Page 12b

Why more and more Children are Developing Type 1 Diabetes – Page 12c

Type 1 Diabetes in Animals – Page 12d

Hypotheses about the Causes of Type 1 Diabetes in Very Young Children, Older Children and Full Grown Adults – Page 12e