Neurobiomechanics - Biomechanics and Neurology - Page I 1 I 2 I 3 I 4 I 5 I 6 

Exercises on Trampoline and Neural Development

(Neuromuscular activity during jumping on a trampoline)

From the point of a purpose of doing physical activity, there is a difference between exercises on treadmills and stationary bikes compared to physical activities involving jumping on trampoline.
Physical activities like walking and running on a tread mill have no purpose,
Physical activities involving jumping on a trampoline has purpose because we propel ourselves in the height.

 

1.      By walking or running on a treadmill we do not travel from one place to another of what is supposed to be intention of walking and running.

 

2.      By jumping on a trampoline, we propel ourselves from the ground to the height (vertical jump) or we propel ourselves in the height-distance. We propel our self in the height and land on the same spot (vertical jump) or we propel ourselves in the height and distance where we jump from one place and land on another.

 

The problem for the neural development is the trampoline’s rebounding effect by jumping and the shock absorbing effect by landing.

 

As mentioned above, by doing exercises on a treadmill and stationary bike the neuromuscular control centre is under-active but by doing exercises on a trampoline or bouncy castle, the neuromuscular control centre is overactive.

 

Jumping on a trampoline involves the increased neuromuscular control centre activity but because of the rebounding and shock absorbing effect it doesn’t involve to the same extent the musculoskeletal activity. (Compared to the activity level of the neuromuscular control centre and the central nervous system activity, the musculoskeletal system and neuromuscular peripheral system is under-active).

 

Rebounding effect of the trampoline enables us to propel our self in the height (jump) without an appropriate involvement of the musculoskeletal system.

 

Shock-absorbing effect of the trampoline enables us to land without an appropriate involvement of the musculoskeletal system.

 

The trampoline’s rebounding effect enable us to jump in the height far more than what is the real ability of the musculoskeletal system. On the other side, the trampoline’s shock-absorbing effect enables us to land safely from a bigger height than what is the real ability of the musculoskeletal system.

 

The neuromuscular control centre is highly involved in the physical activity of jumping and landing on the trampoline, but because of the trampoline’s rebounding effect and shock absorbing effect relative to the height of the jump, the musculoskeletal system and neuromuscular peripheral system are under-active.

 

 

Because of gravity, every jump is followed by a land. Jumping without landing is possible only in weightlessness. On Earth, it is impossible to do jumping without landing.

 

1.      During jumping (lift up), the body is exposed to gravitation forces above 1G (simulated hyper-gravity).

 

2.      During landing (free fall), the body is exposed to a force of gravity that is below 1G (simulated microgravity).

 

By jumping on the real ground, the body is actively exposed to gravitation forces above 1G (simulated hyper-gravity).

 

By landing on the real ground, the human body is actively exposed to microgravity (simulated weightlessness).

 

Because of the trampoline’s rebounding effect, by jumping on a trampoline the body is to a greater extent passively exposed to gravitation forces above 1G (simulated hyper-gravity).

 

Because of the trampoline’s shock absorbing effect, by free fall and landing on a trampoline the human body is to a greater extent passively exposed to microgravity (simulated weightlessness).

 

1.      Just a few jumps on the real ground is strenuous and after each jump we become remarkably more exhausted.

 

2.      Jump on a trampoline is far less strenuous and it is possible for a much longer time to be involved in repeated jumping.

 

Because of the rebounding effect, by jumping on a trampoline the human body is exposed to changing gravity (hyper-gravity and microgravity) to a far greater extent and more repeatedly than by jumping on the real ground.

 

a)      By jumping on the real ground, the musculoskeletal system gets stronger.

 

b)      The evidence points to the conclusion that by jumping on a trampoline, the musculoskeletal system does not get stronger.

 

The trampoline’s shock absorbing effect reduces ground impact force by landing. (The ground impact force is the factor responsible for improving the bone density induced by jumping on a firm ground.)

 

Side note: If jumping on a trampoline increase the bone density then children will be less prone to fractures and dislocated joints. The fact is that despite the shock absorbing effect, children in a great number suffer from fractures and dislocated joints which points towards the conclusion that jumping on a trampoline negatively affects the bone density and musculoskeletal activity.

 

Mastering the jumping and landing skill on a trampoline makes it harder to learn properly jumping and landing skills on the real ground and on the other side, it negatively affects the development of the neuromuscular control system. (The jumping and landing skill that have once been learned on the bouncy castle and trampoline need to be unlearned.)

 

Jumping on the trampoline is a physical activity that involves a repetitive motion where the neuromuscular control centre and to the central and periphery nervous system is highly involved in a repetitive motion, but the muscular system and neuromuscular peripheral system are underactive.

 

Mastered jumping and landing skill on a trampoline doesn’t improve the jumping skill and jumping ability on the real ground. This means that mastering jumping and landing skills on a trampoline doesn’t have any use in the real world. On the other side, learned jumping and landing skill on the trampolines is a real obstacle to learning jumping and landing skill on the real ground.

 

To master jumping and landing skill on the real ground, it needs to jump from the real ground and land on the real ground.

 

Jumping is a physical activity but is also a neuromuscular system activity. (The neuromuscular system consists of the neuromuscular control centre and neuromuscular peripheral system.)

 

The appropriate activity of the neuromuscular system is a factor which determines its appropriate development.

 

A proper development of the neuromuscular system happens when the neuromuscular control centre activity is appropriate to the musculoskeletal activity and it is involved in a meaningful activity.

 

1.      The neuromuscular control centre ability is connected with the ability of the musculoskeletal system.

 

2.      Repetitive jumping in the height above the real ability of the musculoskeletal system leads to the neuromuscular control centre and central nervous system to become overstrained.

 

By repetitive jumping on the trampoline or bouncy castle, the muscular system and neuromuscular periphery system is underused, but the central nervous system and neuromuscular control centre is overused.

 

Mastering the jumping skill on a trampoline, children do not learn the real jumping skill. They learn the “trampoline jumping and landing skill” that has no use for real life.

 

As more the trampoline-jumping skill is mastered, more damage is done to the neuromuscular control centre, neuromuscular periphery system and the central and periphery nervous system.

 

As the children’s motor skill is less developed, the more they are sensitive to physical activities on a trampoline.

 

Repetitive motion (jumping and landing) on the bouncy castle is at the same time a repetitive brain activity (repetitive neuromuscular control centre activity).

 

Especially for very young children, playing on bouncy castles is more damaging than for older children.   

 

When a child is jumping on a trampoline, he/she is physical active but he/she does not play. Actually, a child doesn’t play at all on trampolines; he/she is only involved in a pleasurable but mindless physical activity.

 

Side note: According to almost all organisations involved in the research and treatment of autism, trampolines are regarded as a valuable tool for therapy for children with autism and sensory integration disorders.  How this is terribly wrong can be compared to if alcohol use is regarded as a valuable tool of therapy for alcoholics, or cocaine is a valuable tool of therapy for drug addicts.
 
 

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Biomechanics and Neural System (sensory system and neuromuscular system)


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Exercises that Negatively Affect Neural Development and Health

Treadmill and Voluntary Movement Disorder - Page 4

Trampoline and Neuromuscular Activity – Page 5


Exercises that Positively Affect Neural Development and Physical Health

A few exercises-physical activities which have positive effect on development and health are described in the article “Explaining the Mystery of the South East Stroke Belt”

1)  Foreword – Page 1a

2)  Introduction – Page 1b

3)  Physical Geography and Stroke Incidences – Page 1c

4)  The Reasons for the Lower Incidence of Stroke in Florida – Page 1d

5)  The Reasons for the Higher Incidence of Stroke in North Florida than in South Florida – Page 2a

6)  The Reasons for the Lower Incidence of Stroke in the New York Metropolitan Area – Page 2b

6)  The Reasons for the Lower Incidence of Stroke in the New York Metropolitan Area – Page 2b


7)  The Reasons for the Racial Disparity in Stroke Incidence – Page 3a

8) Susceptibility to Stroke when Migrated to Geographical Regions with Lower Incidence of Stroke – Page 3b

9)  Summary – Page 3c 


Book:  Autism Linked to Stationary Bikes, Treadmills, Trampolines and Bouncy Castles (Contents of this Book) – Page 6

Text Box

Third Edition - Modern Science of Biomechanics & Weight Gain and Weight Loss - (Paperback - Black & White interior) In this book, there is a ground breaking discovery of the biological basis of fat formation on the body and the mechanism underlying body fat distribution. Discoveries revealed in this book will enable us to efficiently and effectively solve the problem of obesity.
Real science of weight gain and weight loss
Also, this book will explain why humans are the only ones who are able to gain over 500% or more body weight above their normal body weight, and why all other species do not.
In the second part of this book, POSTURAL AND MOTOR SKILL EXERCISES are described for the first time ever, which will enable everyone in a short time to cure obesity and improve health and overall wellbeing.
Paperback       E-Book


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